Kingsnake.com Blog - Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/ Reptiles and Amphibians en Serendipity 2.3.5 - http://www.s9y.org/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 16:59:54 GMT http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/templates/2k11/img/s9y_banner_small.png RSS: Kingsnake.com Blog - Featured Contributor - Reptiles and Amphibians http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/ 100 21 The Yellow-blotched Palm Pit Viper http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5352-The-Yellow-blotched-Palm-Pit-Viper.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5352-The-Yellow-blotched-Palm-Pit-Viper.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5352 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5352 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/palmpitviper3.jpg" alt=""><br />Yellow-blotched Palm Pit Vipers remain comparatively uncommon in collections.</center><br /> This montane, arboreal, venomous beauty, ranges from the state of Chiapas, Mexico to northern Guatemala. Like is congenerics, it is small (to about 30 inches) and slender in build. The tail is strongly prehensile. As with most snakes, both the common and the scientific name may be misleading. Although most examples are leaf-green with prominent black edging around the yellowish dorsal blotches and black facial markings, and some have black-edged green blotches that are nearly the same as the body in color. Others may be uniform green, lacking both dorsal and facial black patterning. Black, variably distinct, irregular vertebral striping may connect the dorsal blotches. If present this marking is often most discernable anteriorly. The belly of adults is usually marginally lighter than the dorsum and neonates are a pale green with the expected dark markings. Captives readily accept mice and it is expected that in the wild the diet may include small rodents, mouse opossums, and, for neonate vipers treefrogs and lizards.<br /> <br /> The Yellow-blotched Palm Pit Viper, <em>Bothriechis aurifer</em>, considered by biologists to be a “vulnerable species,” is not frequently imported and is currently uncommon in both zoo and private collections.<br /> <br /> Seemingly little is known, or at least has been published about the venom of this pit viper. I’ll close here by saying that as with any venomous snake, extreme care should be used when handling. <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5352-The-Yellow-blotched-Palm-Pit-Viper.html#extended">Continue reading "The Yellow-blotched Palm Pit Viper"</a> Mon, 09 Aug 2021 11:49:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5352-guid.html Comments on the Southeastern Slimy Salamander http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5314-Comments-on-the-Southeastern-Slimy-Salamander.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5314-Comments-on-the-Southeastern-Slimy-Salamander.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5314 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5314 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/SoutheasternSlimySalamander2.jpg" alt=""><br />A profile of the Southeastern Slimy Salamander.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> <em>Plethodon grobmani</em>, the Southeastern Slimy Salamander, is a creature of pinewoods habitats. It was once fairly common in our neighborhood. Today (2021) following several lengthy droughts and a major attack of pine bark beetles (and the resulting death of old pine stands), this salamander is almost unknown here. At the turn of the century I would go across the street, enter the pinewoods, and in a half hour search say “howdy-do” to about a dozen slimys. Compare that to my occasional searches over the last 10 years when my exact total was one—a single salamander-- and it was not in the best of shape. Of course, as already mentioned, most of the pine trees in that area are gone also, victims of the infestation of pine-bark beetles.<br /> <br /> In other locales, where the pine bark beetle plague was less pronounced than here, this white-flecked black salamander remains easily found in pine and mixed woodlands. Like others of this, genus this salamander has no aquatic larval stage. The egg clutch is deposited in or beneath moist fallen pines and development, from the newly deposited eggs, through metamorphosis, to emergence as a miniature of the adults occurs in the egg capsule.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5314-Comments-on-the-Southeastern-Slimy-Salamander.html#extended">Continue reading "Comments on the Southeastern Slimy Salamander"</a> Mon, 26 Jul 2021 00:12:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5314-guid.html Eastern Rat Snake No. Yellow Rat Snake, Yes http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5313-Eastern-Rat-Snake-No.-Yellow-Rat-Snake,-Yes.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5313-Eastern-Rat-Snake-No.-Yellow-Rat-Snake,-Yes.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5313 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5313 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/yellowratsnake2.JPG" alt=""><br />A Yellow Rat Snake from Central Florida .</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Despite their need for papers and what the geneticists claim, I continue to follow the Linnaeus method and recognize subspecies. To that end, this is now and has been almost forever the Yellow Rat Snake, <em>Pantherophis obsoleta quadrivittata.</em> There are 4 other subspecies, including the nominate form, the northeastern Black Rat Snake, in this species group.<br /> <br /> It is at the southeastern edge of its range that the Black Rat Snake slips gently into the yellow race. First the southernmost Black Rat Snakes assume a dorsolateral pattern of stripes and a greenish hue and as the greenish rats continue further south they become the traditional and long recognized yellow subspecies. But way south, down near Lake Okeechobee, when the Everglades was truly a river of grass, before the rice fields, the sugarcane, the sodfields, before the maze of drainage canals and Brazilian pepper, the yellow rat snake lost all but a vestige of stripes, assumed a deep orange color, and became the Everglades rat snake. Human influx = habitat destruction. And despite the efforts of the state, if such efforts, are actually real, habitat destruction continues, seemingly almost unabated.<br /> <br /> But now back to comments regarding the yellow rat snake. They are real, and they continue to exist, perhaps in reduced numbers, over most if not all, of their long-described range. They remain rather common in our neighborhood, but houses are now quickly replacing the woodlands here. I can only hope for the best. Long live the Yellow Rat Snake.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5313-Eastern-Rat-Snake-No.-Yellow-Rat-Snake,-Yes.html#extended">Continue reading "Eastern Rat Snake No. Yellow Rat Snake, Yes"</a> Mon, 19 Jul 2021 00:03:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5313-guid.html The Giant Gladiator Treefrog http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5312-The-Giant-Gladiator-Treefrog.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5312-The-Giant-Gladiator-Treefrog.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5312 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5312 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/GladiatorTreefrog1.jpg" alt=""><br />This Gladiator Treefrog was sitting quietly in a low shrub.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> This big brown(ish) treefrog is, at an adult length of 5 inches, one of the largest hylids from Amazonas to Panama. Although both genders attain this length, males often are marginally the larger. The unveined orangish eyes help differentiate this common treefrog from other large species. The sides and dorsum bear dark markings that may be prominent or almost invisible. All four feet are webbed.<br /> <br /> The Giant Gladiator Treefrog (<em>Hyla</em> (<em>Boana</em>) <em>boans</em>), is commonly seen in riveredge/streamedge shrubs and low trees, and less commonly on the moist shoreline.<br /> <br /> The name of Gladiator was given for males at their breeding sites will grapple in territorial battles. These scraps are made the more serious due to the fact that the males have sharp, bony, thumb excrescences. It is usually the bigger male that wins.<br /> <br /> Nesting depressions may be either natural small shore-edge puddles or a depression dug by the male. There is usually at least a small water-holding connection to the nearby permanent water source. It is through this that the tadpoles reach the permanent water in which they grow and metamorphose.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5312-The-Giant-Gladiator-Treefrog.html#extended">Continue reading "The Giant Gladiator Treefrog"</a> Mon, 12 Jul 2021 00:52:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5312-guid.html That Other “Hog-nosed” Snake http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5310-That-Other-Hog-nosed-Snake.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5310-That-Other-Hog-nosed-Snake.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5310 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5310 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/mexhooknose2.jpg" alt=""><br />The Mexican Hook-nosed Snake is a tiny burrowing species from South Texas and Mexico.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Oh, OK, so it’s not a hog-nosed snake, but in profile, its sharply upturned rostral scale, sure makes it look like one. This is the tiny Mexican Hook-nosed Snake, <em>Ficimia streckeri</em>. A true miniature, it is adult at from 7 to 11 inches, but may, on rare occasions reach a foot and a half in length. The few that I’ve seen (it was Kelly Irwin who introduced Patti and me to this snake) have been under a foot long. In the USA this species is restricted to southern TX, but its range extends far southward in eastern Mexico.<br /> <br /> In keeping with its preference for soils, often near water sources, through which it can easily burrow, this is basically a sand-tan to pale brown or sand-gray(ish) snake with an unpatterned head and a busy pattern of narrow darker bars or spots along the back. The lower sides are basically unpatterned. This little snake can be easily differentiated from hog-nosed snakes, all of which have keeled scales, by its smooth (=unkeeled) body scales. It is usually crepuscular or nocturnal when surface active. <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5310-That-Other-Hog-nosed-Snake.html#extended">Continue reading "That Other “Hog-nosed” Snake"</a> Mon, 05 Jul 2021 00:38:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5310-guid.html That Other “Hog-nosed” Snake http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5311-That-Other-Hog-nosed-Snake.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5311-That-Other-Hog-nosed-Snake.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5311 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5311 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/mexhooknose2.jpg" alt=""><br />The Mexican Hook-nosed Snake is a tiny burrowing species from South Texas and Mexico.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Oh, OK, so it’s not a hog-nosed snake, but in profile, its sharply upturned rostral scale, sure makes it look like one. This is the tiny Mexican Hook-nosed Snake, <em>Ficimia streckeri</em>. A true miniature, it is adult at from 7 to 11 inches, but may, on rare occasions reach a foot and a half in length. The few that I’ve seen (it was Kelly Irwin who introduced Patti and me to this snake) have been under a foot long. In the USA this species is restricted to southern TX, but its range extends far southward in eastern Mexico.<br /> <br /> In keeping with its preference for soils, often near water sources, through which it can easily burrow, this is basically a sand-tan to pale brown or sand-gray(ish) snake with an unpatterned head and a busy pattern of narrow darker bars or spots along the back. The lower sides are basically unpatterned. This little snake can be easily differentiated from hog-nosed snakes, all of which have keeled scales, by its smooth (=unkeeled) body scales. It is usually crepuscular or nocturnal when surface active. <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5311-That-Other-Hog-nosed-Snake.html#extended">Continue reading "That Other “Hog-nosed” Snake"</a> Mon, 05 Jul 2021 00:38:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5311-guid.html Blackie our backyard black racer http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5304-Blackie-our-backyard-black-racer.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5304-Blackie-our-backyard-black-racer.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5304 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5304 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/blackie4.jpg" alt=""><br />Blackie, as she was released.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Blackie has been our backyard black racer for 5+ years now. Although not tame she was very tolerant of our movements around her, spent much time hunting anoles in the backyard and often sunned on the back steps.<br /> <br /> I won’t say we actually loved her, but we surely looked forward to her visits on all but the coldest days.<br /> <br /> About 2 months ago Blackies sustained a serious mauling by our Aussie Shepherd. The mauling, we thought when separating the 2, would be fatal. Blackie had badly torn skin and her back seemed broken in 2 places.<br /> <br /> But she was alive. Patti carefully brought the snake inside and I coiled her as gently as possible on the bottom of a 10 gallon tank, straightened her back at the breaks, covered her, and hoped for the best, whatever that could be.<br /> <br /> Against all odds, she was alive the next morning, lifting her head and flicking her tongue when I put my hand in the tank. But she hadn’t moved her body position so I dropped some dried leaves atop her an added feeling of security, added a water dish, and let her be. And so it went, day after day.<br /> <br /> But then one day about 3 weeks later she had moved, half her body length was atop the leaves and she was busily flicking her tongue. I moved her to the water dish, she drank, and I noticed she was entering a shedding cycle. A few days later she began shedding, I assisted, and was pleased to see that when I touched her sides behind both breaks she moved away from my finger. She had feeling!<br /> <br /> We decided to keep her captive through our winter, just hoping she’ll be releasable when the warmth again pervades.<br /> <br /> Footnote: She was released on 24 Feb 2021 and was last seen periscoping for anoles. Good luck, Blackie.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5304-Blackie-our-backyard-black-racer.html#extended">Continue reading "Blackie our backyard black racer"</a> Mon, 28 Jun 2021 00:38:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5304-guid.html West African Gaboon Viper http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5303-West-African-Gaboon-Viper.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5303-West-African-Gaboon-Viper.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5303 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5303 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/gaboonw1.jpg" alt=""><br />Note the nasal horns on this pretty West African Gaboon Viper.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> West African Gaboon Viper, <em>Bitis gabonica rhinoceros</em>. Except for facial markings, this large sized snake is of very similar appearance to the East African Gaboon Viper but has prominent nasal horns. It too attains a heavy bodied, remarkably well camouflaged length of 4 ? to 5 ? feet with females being larger. It is dangerous, very beautiful, and also has a very wide range (rainforest habitats) from Togo westward to Senegal and Mali. Food is primarily of small mammals. This subspecies has one dark marking, a diagonal triangle marking on each side of its face.<br /> <br /> The 2 subspecies of Gaboon viper can interbreed with each other as well as with the Rhinoceros Viper. They give birth to live young that may number from as few as 5 to more than 40. Neonates are 10-12 inches in length.<br /> <br /> In activity pattern both subspecies of these shade preferring, fallen-leaf colored, snakes are primarily nocturnal. Both subspecies have very long fangs. Despite their virulent toxins both subspecies are quite popular with herpetoculturists worldwide. Gaboon Vipers are often quiet to the point of placidity during the hours of daylight (keepers—do not be deceived by this, ALWAYS USE EXTREME CAUTION) but become alert and even active after nightfall.<br /> <br /> Gaboons may move in a typical side to side motion but are more inclined to use a straight rectilinear movement, being slowly propelled forward by ventral scale motion.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5303-West-African-Gaboon-Viper.html#extended">Continue reading "West African Gaboon Viper"</a> Mon, 21 Jun 2021 00:33:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5303-guid.html East African Gaboon Viper http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5302-East-African-Gaboon-Viper.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5302-East-African-Gaboon-Viper.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5302 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5302 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/gaboone2.jpg" alt=""><br />Dangerous but a hobbyist favorite, the East African Gaboon Viper.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> The Gaboon Vipers, often referred to as Gaboon Adders<br /> <br /> At one time the Gaboon Viper, <em>Bitis gabonica</em>, contained 2 subspecies, the east African, Bitis gabonica gabonica, and the West African, <em>Bitis gabonica rhinoceros</em>. The two were of pretty similar appearance, the most noticeable difference being dark facial markings and the length of the vertical nasal projections. The East African race has 2 facial markings, a suborbital triangle or spot and a diagonal temporal triangle and short horns while the West African beauty had only the diagonal temporal triangle (it lacked the suborbital spot) and long horns. The two were ostensibly capable of interbreeding.<br /> <br /> Then along came genetics and what was one species became 2, but the external differentiating factors remained the same. Genetically, it is thought that the West African Gaboon Viper is more closely allied to the very different appearing Rhinoceros Viper than to its East African lookalike. Call them what you choose, I’ll stick with the Linnaean subspecies concept.<br /> <br /> East African Gaboon Viper, <em>Bitis gabonica gabonica</em>. Everything about this snake is “very.” Very large (4 ? -5 ? feet long). Females are larger than males. This very heavy bodied, very well camouflaged snake that is very dangerous, very beautiful, has very short nasal protuberances (often merely a pair of bumps at the tip of the snout), and a very wide range (forest and savanna habitats) from Benin to western Kenya and south to Zimbabwe and Zululand. Food is primarily of small mammals. Only one dark triangle on each side of face. There is no suborbital spot or blotch.<br /> <br /> They give birth to live young that may number from as few as 5 to more than 40. Neonates are 10-12 inches in length.<br /> <br /> Gaboons may move in a typical side to side motion but are more inclined to use a straight rectilinear movement, being slowly propelled forward by ventral scale motion.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5302-East-African-Gaboon-Viper.html#extended">Continue reading "East African Gaboon Viper"</a> Mon, 14 Jun 2021 08:23:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5302-guid.html The Solomon Island Ground Boa http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5298-The-Solomon-Island-Ground-Boa.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5298-The-Solomon-Island-Ground-Boa.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5298 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5298 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/candoia2.jpg" alt=""><br />A profile of the Solomon Island Ground Boa.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> <strong>Common Name:</strong> Solomon Island Ground Boa<br /> <strong><br /> Scientific name:</strong> <em>Candoia paulsoni</em><br /> <br /> <strong>Range:</strong> Solomon Islands and other nearby Islands.<br /> <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>Nears 4 feet, males are the smaller gender.<br /> <br /> <strong>Color:</strong> Individually variable. Capable of considerable metachrosis (voluntary, usually day to night color changes). Ground colors red-orange through orange to brown, occasionally cream to white. Usually a prominent darker dorsal zig-zag pattern.<br /> <br /> <strong>Reproduction:</strong> Live-bearing<br /> <strong>Comments:</strong> Once a herpetoculturist favorite, today it is not as commonly seen.<br /> <br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5298-The-Solomon-Island-Ground-Boa.html#extended">Continue reading "The Solomon Island Ground Boa"</a> Tue, 08 Jun 2021 10:34:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5298-guid.html Meet the Arabian Sand Boa http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5285-Meet-the-Arabian-Sand-Boa.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5285-Meet-the-Arabian-Sand-Boa.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5285 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5285 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/arabiansandboa1.jpg" alt=""><br />Note the enlarged rostral scale and position of the eyes on the Arabian Sand Boa.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Sand boas of various types have been hobbyist favorites for decades. Perhaps foremost in the lineup has been the Kenya sand boa. But other species have also paraded through. Rough-scales, Mueller’s. European and others have all had their “15 minutes” of fame. But way back on the “tag end” of the lineup has been the coolest sand boa of all. This is the Arabian Sand Boa, a species truly specialized for life in and beneath the sands of the arid Arabian Peninsula and Iran.<br /> <br /> Having an adult length of about 15 inches, the Arabian Sand Boa, <em>Eryx </em>(<em>Gongylophis</em> to some) <em>jayakeri,</em> is one of, if not THE, smallest member of this group. The eyes are small and are set high on the head rather than on the sides. With its wide, wedge-shaped rostral (nose-tip) scale and snout, this little snake is a streamlined burrower that needs only to show its eyes to watch for the approach of lizards and other prey items. During the heat of the day the snake is usually deeper in the substrate than during the comparative coolness of evening.<br /> <br /> The ground color of this tiny boa is sand tan, gray, or orangish. It is profusely marked dorsally and laterally with dark bands, half bands, or blotches. These markings narrow as they near the lower sides.<br /> <br /> An egg-laying species, clutch size is between 2 and 7 eggs. Incubation is said to be ~66 days. I am unaware of the size of the hatchlings but they are said to be so small that they have difficulty eating newborn pinky mice.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5285-Meet-the-Arabian-Sand-Boa.html#extended">Continue reading "Meet the Arabian Sand Boa"</a> Mon, 31 May 2021 00:02:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5285-guid.html Meet the Black-headed or Royal Rat Snake http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5284-Meet-the-Black-headed-or-Royal-Rat-Snake.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5284-Meet-the-Black-headed-or-Royal-Rat-Snake.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5284 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5284 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img class="serendipity_image_left" width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/royalrat1.jpg" alt=""><br />This is an adult Royal Rat Snake.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Of the Diadem Snakes, it is <em>Spalerosophis atriceps</em> the Black-headed or Royal Rat Snake that is most sought by hobbyists. A pretty but quietly colored snake, the ground color may vary from sand gray to orange. It has irregular dark blotches and spots both dorsally and laterally. The spotting may be reddish on juveniles but darkens as the snake ages. The head may be black or black and tan dorsally and the face may be orange to red, with or without black. The belly may be unmarked white or small dark blotches may be present.<br /> <br /> These snakes are weak constrictors at best, and often smother live prey, such as a mouse, by grasping and holding it by the nose while laying body coils atop the rodent.<br /> <br /> This snake may bite if carelessly restrained or otherwise frightened.<br /> <br /> Adults may exceed 6 feet by a few inches. Hatchlings are 12 to 14 inches long.<br /> <br /> Once commonly bred in the USA, the Royal Rat Snake is now rather infrequently seen. Many who have successfully bred this species have provided a several weeks winter brumation with temperatures in the mid 50sF. A clutch normally contains between 3 and 12 eggs.<br /> <br /> India and Pakistan comprise the range of this snake.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5284-Meet-the-Black-headed-or-Royal-Rat-Snake.html#extended">Continue reading "Meet the Black-headed or Royal Rat Snake"</a> Mon, 24 May 2021 00:57:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5284-guid.html Meet the Spider Gecko http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5276-Meet-the-Spider-Gecko.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5276-Meet-the-Spider-Gecko.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5276 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5276 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="99%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/spidergecko1.jpg" alt=""><br />The "spindly" legs of spider geckos were always apparent.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Although the Spider Gecko, also known as the Persian Spider gecko, <em>Agamura persica</em> for those of you scientifically inclined, was never particularly common in the pet industry, it was once at least sporadically available. As is suggested by both its common and species name, it ranges widely in Iran (also Pakistan and Afghanistan) Today (2021 it seems that it is one of the many reptile and amphibian species lost to the herp-hobby.<br /> <br /> This is a sand-gray colored gecko, slender of body and long of leg and tail. The tail accounts for a little less than half of the Spider Gecko’s 5 to 6 inch length. Adult males are often a bit larger than the females. Males have noticeable hemipenial bulges.<br /> <br /> This gecko is not particularly fast but is said to be quite agile as it moves about its rocky arid homeland. It is said to be active at temperatures between 60 and 95F. Captives quickly grew accustomed to close approach and would stand statue-still until actually touched. Like many other gecko species Spider geckos are primarily both crepuscular and nocturnal, but occasionally foraged and basked diurnally.<br /> <br /> It is oviparous.<br /> <br /> We hope you have enjoyed this short journey into our bygone days of herpetoculture. <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5276-Meet-the-Spider-Gecko.html#extended">Continue reading "Meet the Spider Gecko"</a> Mon, 17 May 2021 00:20:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5276-guid.html Woodland Salamanders http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5264-Woodland-Salamanders.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5264-Woodland-Salamanders.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5264 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5264 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/sally1.jpg" alt=""><br />The brassy and white markings and range of the Tellico Salamander renders it a rather easily identified member of the Slimy Salamander group.</center><br /> By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> This group of salamanders, all of the genus <em>Plethodon</em>, is very aptly named, for not a single one out of the ~47 described species is tied to an aquatic habitat in any manner. To a species they are woodland dwellers that live their lives in woodland settings. Moisture is, of course, as necessary for these salamander’s survival as it is for any and all amphibians, but the moisture is accessed by rainfall, fog, and mists, and for some species, in streamedge situations (but not immersion). These salamanders are small and slender, varying from 3 ?”, (Red-backed, Peaks of Otter, and many others) to the nearly 9” of Yonahlossee and Bat Cave Salamanders).<br /> <br /> All are oviparous, their egg clutches being laid in decaying logs, beneath rocks, or other such moisture holding situations including burrows. There is no aquatic larval stage, the young emerging from the egg- capsules as miniatures of the adults.<br /> <br /> While some Woodland Salamanders are easy to identify, others are difficult. This is especially so of the 13 species that comprise the Slimy Salamander group. Some of these latter are identifiable only by locale or genetic studies.<br /> <br /> And now, enjoy the photos. <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5264-Woodland-Salamanders.html#extended">Continue reading "Woodland Salamanders"</a> Mon, 03 May 2021 09:45:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5264-guid.html The Carpet/Diamond Python group http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5258-The-CarpetDiamond-Python-group.html Featured Contributor http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5258-The-CarpetDiamond-Python-group.html#comments http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/wfwcomment.php?cid=5258 0 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/rss.php?version=2.0&type=comments&cid=5258 (Richard Bartlett) <center><img width="95%" src="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/uploads/MORELIA1.jpg" alt=""><br />An uncommon striped pattern on McDowell's Carpet Python.</center>By Dick and Patti Bartlett<br /> <br /> Excluding the Green Tree, Amethystine and Oenpelli pythons, Australia is home to 3 species and 6 subspecies of heavy bodied, moderately sized (to about 8 feet/ 2- 1/3 meters) Carpet Pythons.<br /> <UL><LI><em>Morelia bredli</em>, Centralian or Bredl’s Carpet Python<br /> <LI><em>Morelia carinata</em>, Rough-scaled Python<br /> <LI><em>Morelia spilota</em>, Diamond Python and Carpet Python<UL><br /> <LI><em>M. s. cheneyi</em>, Tableland Carpet Python<br /> <LI><em>M. s. imbricata</em>, Southern Carpet Python<br /> <LI><em>M. s. mcdowelli</em>, McDowell’s Carpet Python<br /> <LI><em>M. s. metcalfi,</em> Interior Carpet Python<br /> <LI><em>M. s. spilota</em>, Diamond Python<br /> <LI><em>M. s. variegata</em>, Northern Carpet Python<br /> </UL></UL><br /> Except for the southeasterly most member, the one that is usually referred to as the Diamond Python, the carpet pythons are often referred to simply as Carpet Snakes by Australians. All are constrictors, all are nonvenomous, all are capable of biting, but their readiness to do so varies individually. All are accomplished climbers but may be found terrestrially in habitats as diverse as gardens, attics, or the remote outback. All are oviparous, reproducing by egg clutches that are protected by the female. All feed primarily on small mammals and birds.<br /> <br /> All (except the Diamond Python which is black with a variable but often speckled pattern of white or cream) are colored in various shades of yellowish, cream or tan with a darker pattern. But sometimes the dark color prevails, and the light markings are reduced in size or number. Subspecies may interbreed where their ranges abut or overlap. The resulting hatchlings may be patterned non-typically. Encompassing all species and suggested subspecies the ranges include southern Western Australia, then hops to eastern South Australia and northward well into western Queensland, then throughout most of New South Wales and northward in the coastal forests and plateaus to Cape York. Then after another break in range it may again be found in northern Northern Territory westward to newest Australia. Bredl’s Python, seen as a full species by some and as a subspecies of the carpet python by others, seems more arboreal and ranges widely in southwest Northern Territory. The uncommon Rough-scaled Python is found in northwest Kimberly Region of Western Australia.<br /> <a class="block_level" href="http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5258-The-CarpetDiamond-Python-group.html#extended">Continue reading "The Carpet/Diamond Python group"</a> Mon, 26 Apr 2021 00:58:00 -0500 http://www.sgbmsite.com/blog/archives/5258-guid.html 亚洲.欧美.中文.日韩aⅴ_国产免费高清在线视频观看网_日韩午夜的免费理论片